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Producing bio-carbon from Brazil nut shells at the CINCIA facility 20km southwest of Puerto Maldonado. Mining has deforested the landscape and degraded soil in vast areas in Madre de Dios and other surrounding Amazonian regions leading to soil deterioration, water quality losses, and a decrease in vegetation cover. CINCIA is experimenting with bio-carbon as a potential remediation tool. Bio-carbon is a low-cost, technically simple product and process that converts locally available materials (e.g., brazil nut shells, cacao husks, or cedar sawdust) into a soil additive that helps increase nutrients and water retention in the soil, improving acidity and stimulating the microbial functions that making reforestation efforts more effective. Puerto Maldonado, Madre de Dios, Peru.
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©Jason Houston/iLCP
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Peru - La Pampa Gold Mining 2019
Producing bio-carbon from Brazil nut shells at the CINCIA facility 20km southwest of Puerto Maldonado. Mining has deforested the landscape and degraded soil in vast areas in Madre de Dios and other surrounding Amazonian regions leading to soil deterioration, water quality losses, and a decrease in vegetation cover. CINCIA is experimenting with bio-carbon as a potential remediation tool. Bio-carbon is a low-cost, technically simple product and process that converts locally available materials (e.g., brazil nut shells, cacao husks, or cedar sawdust) into a soil additive that helps increase nutrients and water retention in the soil, improving acidity and stimulating the microbial functions that making reforestation efforts more effective. Puerto Maldonado, Madre de Dios, Peru.