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[CONTRACTORS NAMES TK] were hired by CINCIA to use their aquatic drone to capture bathymetric and basic water quality data on the ponds formed by mining in La Pampa. Understanding how deep the mining worked the soil helps estimate the amount of subsurface and ancient carbon released in the pocess. It may also help with environmental management decisions regarding how to remediate and/or use the ponds in the future. Following Peru's February 2019 militarized crackdown on illegal and unofficial alluvial gold mining in the La Pampa region of Madre de Dios, Wake Forest University's Puerto Maldonado-based Centro de Innovación Científica Amazonia (CINCIA), a leading research institution for the development of technological innovation for biological conservation and environmental restoration in the Peruvian Amazon, is applying years of scientific research and technical experience related to understanding mercury contamination and managing Amazonian ecosystems. What they learn will help guide urgent remediation, restoration, and reforestation efforts that can also serve as models for how we address the tropic’s most dramatically devastated landscapes around the world. La Pampa, Madre de Dios, Peru.
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©Jason Houston/iLCP
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Peru - La Pampa Gold Mining 2019
[CONTRACTORS NAMES TK] were hired by CINCIA to use their aquatic drone to capture bathymetric and basic water quality data on the ponds formed by mining in La Pampa. Understanding how deep the mining worked the soil helps estimate the amount of subsurface and ancient carbon released in the pocess. It may also help with environmental management decisions regarding how to remediate and/or use the ponds in the future. Following Peru's February 2019 militarized crackdown on illegal and unofficial alluvial gold mining in the La Pampa region of Madre de Dios, Wake Forest University's Puerto Maldonado-based Centro de Innovación Científica Amazonia (CINCIA), a leading research institution for the development of technological innovation for biological conservation and environmental restoration in the Peruvian Amazon, is applying years of scientific research and technical experience related to understanding mercury contamination and managing Amazonian ecosystems. What they learn will help guide urgent remediation, restoration, and reforestation efforts that can also serve as models for how we address the tropic’s most dramatically devastated landscapes around the world. La Pampa, Madre de Dios, Peru.